Monday Muse: Frida Kahlo

After the exciting weekend I had at the Friducha art show at La Bodega Gallery, I wanted to share a few of my favorite pieces by Frida Kahlo.

She has been called a Surrealist and I would agree with that label. There is a dream-like quality to her work and a level of detail that creates an intense fabric of symbolism for the viewer to dissect and engage with. Although her likeness has been highly commodified, I believe we must always return to her work, especially the works that are not so easy to look at. Her life was complex as is her work. She is truly one of the most successful female artists and must be remembered first and foremost for her contribution to art.

What do you think of her work? How would you categorize it? How do you identify with the symbolism she presents? I’d love to know!

Monday Muse - Cy Twombly

Another abstract artist that I love is Cy Twombly. His works have a frenetic energy about them that makes them so delightful to look at. Some of the paintings can be described as minimal. The color palette and strokes and marks are quite restrained in terms of variety. That doesn't mean to say his works are boring. Other paintings have a lot of variety and there is a strength to the painting as a whole, as well as lots of little interesting moments happening within the canvas. The canvas has so much movement and rhythm expressed on it. There is also a childlike quality to Twombly's art. It feels as though he approached the canvas and experimented with different colors and strokes and let the composition flow freely. My favorite paintings by him are ones that have a lot of little brushstrokes and colors that make your eyes dance across the canvas. I see a lot of elements that I would like to incorporate into my work in the future. 

I hope you enjoy these works by Cy Twombly!

Monday Muse - Motonaga Sadamasa

Viewing the work of Japanese artist, Motonaga Sadamasa (1922-2011), my eyes dance across the surface of the canvas. The images do not really do the pieces justice because there is so much texture on the surface, due to the artist's use of gravel, sand, resin, and oil paint. The paintings harken to Abstract Expressionism, but with an undertone of psychedelia from the Sixties. I am so inspired by Sadamasa's seemingly random use of different media, which I know was actually very controlled and applied with care. Some of the areas of the paintings remind me of internal organs or the mixing of bodily fluids. The paintings are both beautiful and grotesque at the same time. There is also something about their simplicity which reminds me of Japanese ink drawings (sumi-e), especially the splashed ink drawings of Sesshū TōyōAll of the paintings are quite fascinating in their overall impression, as well as the little moments of magic that happen countless times when one zooms in on the way that two colors are juxtaposing one another or how colors have dripped and entangled on the canvas.

I hope you enjoy these selections by Motonaga Sadamasa and that they inspire your Monday